2021 in review: A little progress against anti-LGBTQ laws, lots of resistance

2021 has been a year of slight progress in the fight against anti-LGBTQ laws, with many nations fiercely resisting any acknowledgement that their LGBTQ citizens deserve the same rights as everyone else.

Namibia Pride called for the repeal of the country’s ban on same-sex intimacy. (Carl Modler photo courtesy of Out & Proud Namibia / Mamba Online)

During the year, one nation — the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan — repealed its anti-LGBTQ law and several other nations seemed close to doing so.

But many nations stubbornly resisted repeated appeals for change and, as the year wound down, Ghana and Senegal were deliberating proposals to increase the penalties that sexual minorities already face there.

This is a quick year-end review of changes in anti-LGBTQ laws in countries covered by the Erasing 76 Crimes news site, which focuses on the human toll of 70+ countries’ anti-LGBTI laws and the struggle to repeal them.

 

One nation repeals anti-LGBTQ law

Countries that recently repealed or overturned such laws include:

Also:

 

Namibia, Mauritius and Singapore consider whether to repeal anti-LGBTQ laws

 

Three Caribbean nations stubbornly refuse to repeal anti-LGBTQ laws

 

Uganda parliament passes anti-LGBTQ bill; president blocks it

 

Homophobes in Ghana seek tougher new anti-LGBTQ law

 

Anti-LGBTQ protest in Senegal. (File photo)

 

Homophobes in Senegal seek tougher new anti-LGBTQ law

 

Written by Colin Stewart

Colin Stewart is a 45-year journalism veteran living in Southern California. He is the president of the St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation, which supports LGBTQ+ rights advocacy journalism, Erasing 76 Crimes. Contact him at [email protected]

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