Confronting hatred: the Joe Odero story

Donate to the Joe Odero Fund

Joe Odero in the hospital after the attack.

Joe Odero in the hospital after the January attack

Why donate? To support the work and save the life of Kenyan LGBTI activist/ journalist Joseph Odero, targeted for assassination for his work on behalf of a murdered LGBTI teenager.

Despite a nearly fatal attack in January, Odero testified in court about what the youth told him on his death-bed. Because of the physical damage he suffered in that attack, Odero needed a kidney transplant to survive. Financial donations from supporters made that operation possible, along with a donated kidney from a family friend.

The operation was a success, but his attackers are still seeking his life. In July, they were closing in; they found his city, but not the hospital bed where he was lying unprotected. Joe is now out of the hospital, hiding in a new location.

He needs to move far beyond the reach of Kenyan rifles and machetes. With your support, that will be possible. Without it, his life expectancy will be low.

To keep this courageous young man alive, donate to the Joe Odero Fund.

These articles provide the backdrop for the “Confronting Hatred” series:

These are the articles that have been published so far in the “Confronting Hatred” series, which describe the remarkable events, courageous actions and violent reactions that led to Odero’s current plight:

Further articles in the series will describe more of the astounding, true, horrifying violence that Odero has faced — his brother attacked and hospitalized, a friend attacked and hospitalized, threats of arson/murder if his family did not disclose his location, armed men chasing and shooting at the taxi carrying him and and his lawyer to the trial, and more.

Because Odero remains at risk from further attacks, his current location is undisclosed and protective pseudonyms are used throughout those articles.

Independent verification of the facts of Odero’s case can be arranged, but only by a limited number of people whose involvement would not put his life at risk.  One independent verification has already been conducted. On behalf of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), a Kenyan reporter looked into Odero’s situation, visited him in the hospital, interviewed him and contacted people to confirm Odero’s account. After the CPJ received that report, the organization agreed to cover the remaining unpaid portion of the hospital bill for Odero’s kidney transplant.

What remains to be accomplished is to move Odero to safety. To make that possible, donate to the Joe Odero Fund.