‘It messed me up big time’: Attacks and taunts against gay Nigerian youth

Openly gay Nigerian student Matthew Blaise recounts the attacks and homophobic slurs he experiences at school.


From the African Human Rights Media Network


Matthew Blaise. Photo Source: Facebook

By Mike Daemon

Undergraduate student Matthew Blaise recently went on Twitter to share about 5 cases of homophobic assaults and harassment he has experienced living openly as a gay youth  in Nigeria.

Homophobic attacks are common in the country. Every day, the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) people are violated by state and non-state actors. Perpetrators enjoy impunity because the law doesn’t protect LGBTIQ+ people.

Religion and ignorance about LGBTI issues are the leading cause of homophobia in Nigeria.

Blaise is frustrated with his situation, having suffered multiple human rights violations and hate crimes says He is now struggling with his mental health, he says.

“Everything that happened to me messed me up big time, I won’t lie. I still haven’t recovered from any of them. I now deal with a complicated paranoia and anxiety. I’m not in a good place mentally at all. Much has happened. I have passed them but I know many will still come” he tweeted.

Read his tweets below.

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Source: Rights Africa

Written by Colin Stewart

Colin Stewart is a 45-year journalism veteran living in Southern California. After his retirement from paid newspaper work in 2011, he launched Erasing 76 Crimes and helped with the Spirit of 76 campaign that assembled a multi-national team of 26 LGBTI rights activists to advocate for change during the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C., in July 2012. He is the president of the St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation, which supports LGBTQ+ rights advocacy journalism, including the Erasing 76 Crimes news site and the African Human Rights Media Network. Contact him via Twitter @76crimes or by email at info@76crimes.com. Mailing address: 21 Marseille, Laguna Niguel CA 92677 USA.

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