Europe / International

Amsterdam and this blog take aim at 73 repressive countries

Pride Walk protesters wore "Erasing 76 Crimes" T-shirts and carried the flags of 73 countries they hope will repeal their anti-LGBT laws. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Amsterdam’s Pride Walk protesters wore “Erasing 76 Crimes” T-shirts and carried the flags of 73 countries they hope will repeal their anti-LGBT laws. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Last month’s Pride Walk in Amsterdam focused attention on victims of the anti-LGBT repression in 73 countries with anti-LGBT laws.

The Erasing 76 Crimes blog helped with preparations for the July 29 march, in which protesters wore “Erasing 76 Crimes” T-shirts.

Amsterdam's Pride Walk included this huge rainbow flag. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Amsterdam’s Pride Walk included this huge rainbow flag. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

In preparation for Pride Walk, a pile of names of 73 nations with anti-LGBT laws awaits the time when they will be attached to the countries' flags. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

In preparation for Pride Walk, this pile of names of 73 nations with anti-LGBT laws awaits the time when they will be attached to the countries’ flags. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Marchers protesting 73 countries’ repressive laws carried those countries’ flags through the streets of Amsterdam.

Pride Walk marcher. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Pride Walk marcher. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

With them were marchers carrying placards supporting 50 specific LGBTI people and LGBTI rights activists at risk at various locations around the world.

The total turnout was 7,500 people, Pride March organizer Hans Verhoeven said.

Protesters in the Pride Walk carry flags of the nations they hope will repeal anti-LGBT laws. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Protesters in Amsterdam’s Pride Walk carried flags of the nations they hope will repeal anti-LGBT laws. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Marchers included about 100 representatives from the 33-country Equal Rights Coalition, an organization of nations that support equality regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Among them were ambassadors, consul generals, attachés and other staff.

Reporter Sinan Can describes his encounter with gay actor Karar Nushi. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Reporter Sinan Can described his encounter with gay actor Karar Nushi. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Verhoeven stated:

Pride Walk sign serves as a memorial for Karar Nushi of Iraq, who was murdered. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

Pride Walk sign served as a memorial for Karar Nushi of Iraq, who was murdered. (Photo courtesy of Pride Walk)

“One of our speakers was Sinan Can, an investigative reporter working for one of the public networks. Some days before Pride Walk he had returned from filming in Iraq and Iran. Filming at a book market in Baghdad, he was approached by a young man: Karar Nushi, an openly gay actor.

“Sinan was interested in his story and interviewed him, asking him why he was openly gay in a country where they hang you for it. His answer was simple: ‘I don’t want to be in the closet all my life.’ The two spent the afternoon together, after which Sinan had to move on to another city. Karar was on a death list of some religious group.

“Days after the interview, Sinan received a message: They had captured Karar, tortured him for two days and left him for dead in the gutter.

“Sinan told me this story a day after he had returned, an emotional conversation. We decided to make Karar the symbol of our Pride Walk and of the Individuals at Risk project.”

In the march, Sinan carried Karar’s individuals-at-risk sign himself.

 

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