Ugandan artist’s view: Imprisoned for 'who they are'

The Erasing 76 Crimes blog here presents another piece of artwork by Vincent Kyabayinze, who uses his art to appeal for respect for the human rights of LGBTI Ugandans.

Uganda's Anti-Homosexuality Law was overturned, but LGBTI people still can face unlawful imprisonment. Artist Vincent Kyabayinze writes that, for LGBTI people, it is common for them to be detained "because of who they are, not only in Uganda but also in others of the 76 countries that criminalize LGBTI persons." (Artwork courtesy of Vincent Kyabayinze)
Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Law was overturned in 2014, but LGBTI Ugandans still can face unlawful imprisonment. Artist Vincent Kyabayinze writes that, for LGBTI people, it is common for them to be detained “because of who they are, not only in Uganda but also in others of the 76 countries that criminalize LGBTI persons.” (Artwork courtesy of Vincent Kyabayinze)

Vincent Kyabayinze is director of Uganda-based East African Visual Artists, which uses visual arts to advocate for human rights, working to improve the visibility, dignity and rights of LGBTI, sex workers and people living with HIV and AIDS.

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Written by Colin Stewart

Colin Stewart is a 45-year journalism veteran living in Southern California. He is the president of the St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation, which supports LGBTQ+ rights advocacy journalism, Erasing 76 Crimes. Contact him at info@76crimes.com.

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200 anti-LGBT arrests on four continents

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