On Independence Day, hopes for a better Jamaica

jamaica-flag
Flag of Jamaica

Today, August 6, Jamaica marks 51 years of independence from the United Kingdom. Just a few days ago, on August 1, we also celebrated 175 years of the Emancipation of all slaves in the former British Empire. Tragically, Emancipation Day this year was marked by two near-fatal homophobic mob attacks in Kingston. These attacks followed closely on the July 22 mob slaying of 17-year-old cross-dresser Dwayne Jones at a street dance in the tourist resort town of Montego Bay.

Some persons question how I can be patriotic and celebrate Jamaica’s independence while the persecution of LGBT Jamaicans continues unabated. My answer is drawn from the symbolism found in the colours of the Jamaican flag. The tri-colour black, green and gold are meant to represent “Hardships there are (black), but the land is green and the sun shines (gold).” As many of you know, I proudly drape myself in this flag as I march in Pride parades around the world. This is because I believe in the flag’s promise.

Simply put, my nation is not perfect and we have many struggles to overcome. However, we have an unshakeable (some might say inexplicable) hope in the future. This feeds my activism. My country will grow into its motto, “Out of Many, One People.” After all, the US motto “E Pluribus, Unum” (Out of Many, One) is still, for many Americans, an unrealized dream. But everyday Americans work to create a more perfect union. Nation-building is never easy, and divergent views will contend and often clash. But, that doesn’t make the process any less valuable.

So, on this Independence Day, I pause to salute my country and its accomplishments. And tomorrow I go back to work and try to fulfill the dream of absolute inclusion for ALL Jamaicans. This is the legacy of our nation’s founders.

Happy Birthday, Jamaica!

Written by Colin Stewart

Colin Stewart is a 45-year journalism veteran living in Southern California. He is the president of the St. Paul’s Foundation for International Reconciliation, which supports LGBTQ+ rights advocacy journalism, Erasing 76 Crimes. Contact him at [email protected]

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  1. An excellent posting, my fellow blogger and a timely reminder that total equality, for our GLBT community, is an unrealized dream and hope for all of us throughout the world. Thank you! 🙂

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